Friday, June 20, 2014

YA books that will change your world view

Last weekend, the lovely Cait from Notebook Sisters made a list of 30 YA books that changed her world view, which was, in turn, based on a list on the same topic done by Epic Reads. Cait asked in her post what her readers would add to the list, and rather than writing the world's longest comment, I figured I'd write a blog post about it. And then stuff happened and here we are nearly a week later WHOOPS.

ANYWAY. I've read 12 of Cait's 30 books, and a mere 6 of Epic Reads' 30 books, which is pretty pathetic considering how much I love YA. And I didn't want to give you a list that was filled with books that only half deserved to be on there in my opinion, so I'm topping my list out at 20 books. Because of reasons.

Code Name Verity - Elizabeth Wein
A book that will teach you about friendship and sacrifice. Also a book that will tear your heart out and jump on the pieces.

Tomorrow, When the War Began - John Marsden
Those of us who live in the city are pretty much screwed if there's a war. The country kids? They'll be okay.

Pushing the Limits - Katie McGarry
Seeing things in black and white isn't always a good thing.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - J.K. Rowling
Bravery can come from the least expected places. And friendship can overcome pretty much anything.

The Fault in Our Stars - John Green
Love can find you when you least expect it. And sometimes? Your hero is actually an asshat.

The Knife of Never Letting Go - Patrick Ness
Be grateful that no one can hear your thoughts.

Saving Francesca - Melina Marchetta
The people you thought were your friends can be just as toxic as internet trolls. And the people you thought you'd never EVER be friends with? Can be just the people you need in your life.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time - Mark Haddon
Just because someone doesn't act the way you expect, doesn't mean they're not just as human as you.

Speak - Lauren Halse Armstrong
Sometimes, the things that are the hardest to say? Are the things that need to be said the most.

Daughter of Smoke and Bone - Laini Taylor
Your exterior can change. It's what's inside that counts. Also, family doesn't end with blood.

The Book Thief - Markus Zusak
Friendships can be made in the most unlikely of places.

Love and Leftovers - Sarah Tregay
The book that made me realise that maybe poetry isn't as bad as I thought it was.

Eleanor & Park - Rainbow Rowell
Don't judge people based on surface appearances.

Thirteen Reasons Why - Jay Asher
Your words can have consequences you wouldn't even anticipate.

Cinder - Marissa Meyer
What others see as a weakness can actually be your strength.

Divergent - Veronica Roth
Pigeonholing people is bad.

Rose Under Fire - Elizabeth Wein
There were non-Jewish people in concentration camps, and their stories are important too.

Mockingjay - Suzanne Collins
Sometimes, biting the hand that feeds you gets you an equally shitty hand.

My Life Next Door - Huntley Fitzpatrick
Your parents are human too, did you know?

Before I Fall - Lauren Oliver
It's never too late to change.

What YA books have changed your world view?

K xx

13 comments:

  1. I KNOW. I had the exact same reaction when I realised that I'd only read six books on their list. Although in my defence, there were at least another half a dozen or so on there that I keep meaning to read but haven't gotten around to yet...

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  2. I loved the Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night. I am going to read Code Name Verity, but I'm waiting for a few days when I can sit and cry because of what I keep hearing.


    Ender's Game. As much as I hate OSC, this book forever changed the way I think about highly intelligent kids. It's an amazing read. Eyes of the Dragon - things aren't always what they seem, and true friends will always help you out. Winter Girls - changed how I think about eating disorders. Beautifully written but gut-wrenching.


    Every time you do a list I add to the books I want to read.

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  3. I finally finished No Name on Monday night.
    It had been about 15 yrs since I had read Woman in White and Moonstone & I forgotten just how wonderfully Wilkie weaves a story together.
    I love your jerky mcjerkface opinion of Clare - very apt!


    Glad you enjoyed it as much as I did.
    I will post my review on the 7th July :-)

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  4. All three of the His Dark Materials books, but The Amber Spyglass in particular.

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  5. My sister doesn't really read. It's not her thing. But even she could not put Code Name Verity down. We were sharing my copy on a road trip and she got so grumpy with me each time I took it back so I could read some more.

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  6. Wilhelmina UptonJune 23, 2014 at 3:48 PM

    My grade 12th and 13 English teacher gave me "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time" to read and give hime feedback. Not sure if he wanted to read it in future classes or if it was just his way of giving me the book to read because I was one of his favourite students.

    Code Name Verity, man. I have about 50 pages to go. As far as my Germaness is concerned, this is so much better than The Book Thief. At least all the German phrases used, make sense. And it is really well paced. But the imminent bad ending...oh boy.

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  7. This is why I became a librarian. It's like having a legit reason to force books onto people.


    Appropriately enough, I'm currently watching the movie of Ender's Game. I think they may have just lost me when they cast Ben Kingsley as a Maori character. Because LOL NOPE.

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  8. NGL, having to share a book like that would have KILLED ME. My brother's birthday was always like three days after Harry Potter came out. I'd buy him the book, then read it sneakily and without cracking the spine before I gave it to him because I knew he read so slowly that I'd get to read it like two months later otherwise.

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  9. I demand that you tell me what you thought of Code Name Verity. Like, immediately.

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  10. I only ever read the first one, and that was when it was published as The Northern Lights. I...did not love it. Perhaps now that I'm (much) older, I should give them another chance...

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  11. Awesome, am looking forward to reading it! :)

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  12. Wilhelmina UptonJune 27, 2014 at 5:20 AM

    I LOVED IT! Maybe I will shoot you an email over the weekend when I'm not half brain dead from two performances so I can flail a bit with you about the book. I've been dying to do so.

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  13. The Book Thief is one of the best books I've read in the last 5+ years. So fantastic and goodness, all the tears.


    I'm reading Code Name Verity right now and am bracing myself for #allthefeels because apparently that's what's going to happen.

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